Jewelry Stands, Buttons, and Pendants

I have been making some pieces sheerly out of delight and experimentation lately. Utilizing thrown parts and pinching/sculpting I made 4 jewelry stands, and slabs with sprig molds or stamps for porcelain buttons and pendants.

Buttons with maple leaf and peacock eye feather pendants.

Buttons with maple leaf and peacock eye feather pendants.

My acute interest in Japanese textile patterns and expressions of mathematic beauty in nature inspired the maple leaf, wave pattern, and peacock motifs expressed in these prototypes.

The four jewelry stand prototypes.

The four jewelry stand prototypes.

The figurative elements, from left to right: dragon, nautilus, ki’rin, and phoenix. Again, a deep love of mythology, Japanese tattoo imagery, and mathematic beauty expressed through the Fibonacci spiral by the cephalopod shell inspired my selection of critters. The dragon is fairly self-explanatory, based primarily on Western image reference, and the nautilus is a stylized representation of actual life. The ki’rin incorporates an amalgam of mythological beasts, from both Occidental unicorns and Japanese ki’rin and the statuary of M. Pena. The phoenix more closely resembles the peacock-feathered version found in traditional Japanese tattoos. While 3 of them feature a standard single stem for keeping rings, the tentacles offer numerous hooks for ring display.

All in a day's work.

All in a day’s work.

Although the hand sculpting required to develop the small-scale creatures consumes a lot of hours I truly enjoyed the process. After a “break” of making some more mundane functional objects I fully intend to churn out another batch.

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Forrest Lesch-Middelton Demonstration

Forrest tidying up a minaret jar.

Forrest tidying up a minaret jar.

My photographs turned out awful so forgive me for that. Forrest Lesch-Middelton visited Collin College in Plano in October, 2012 and I attended the 2nd day of his free demonstration. He broke down his decal making and applying processes, since most of the throwing had to be completed the previous day. Multi-section assembly builds up the minaret jar, shown above on the wheel and below finished on the work table.

Evil blurry laughing Forrest.

Evil blurry laughing Forrest.

I love the way the raw clay still looks so much like the finished pots, so luscious and rich in hue. I’m definitely guilty of spending good money on a few of his pieces.

Two jars, fully decorated.

Two jars, fully decorated.

Decal paper work station.

Decal paper work station.

Forrest layers his own decal papers using white and brown slip. The colors must be laid down in reverse, so the darker pattern lines show on the exterior. Applying the decals resembles putting on a fake tattoo: wetting down the backside of the paper until the slip decal releases onto the surface of the pot.

In parting, Forrest trimming a foot.

In parting, Forrest trimming a foot.

Thank you to Chris Gray for hosting and Forrest for demonstrating!

Upcoming Gallery Exhibition: Wine & Art Show

My work will be on display and available for sale in the Sophy Sam Gallery for the Wine and Art Show on Saturday, February 9th, 2013 from 2 – 7 PM. I am thrilled to be setting up my own work in a traditional gallery again; it brings me back to my university critique days. The pots will also be available for sale during the event, of course. My dear friend Amy Riley will be presenting her awesome linocut prints as well as numerous other local artists showing painting, jewelry, etc. Tickets may be purchased online or on site at a cost of $30 which includes wine, food, and live music with free parking on the street. I hope to see some familiar faces and make new human connections, as always.

Venue website and ticket purchases: Wine and Art Show

As for me, I’m in a making phase so the greenware pots are piling up. Work, work, work! Until next time…